Economic Analysis of Chemo-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

Wayne Kuznar

February 2011, Vol 2, No 1 - Meeting Highlights


Anaheim, CA—Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is associated with a large clinical and economic burden among patients with cancer in a hospital outpatient setting.

Preventing or controlling the onset of CINV in the index chemotherapy cycle could lead to fewer events in subsequent cycles, said Sanjeev Balu, PhD, Health Outcomes, Eisai, Woodcliff Lake, NJ, and lead investigator of a retrospective observational study. His data were presented at the clinical meeting of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists.

Data from a hospital-service database (Premier’s Perspective), which contains data from more than 600 hospitals across the United States, were analyzed to identify 11,495 patients with cancer who were treated with chemotherapy; 8606 received antiemetic prophylaxis for the entire follow- up period (8 chemotherapy cycles or 6 months postindex date) and 2689 did not.

All-cause treatment costs, which included costs for CINV treatments (inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department visits) totaled $138 million, for an average cost per day of $2881.90, said Dr Balu.

Considering only CINV treatment– related pharmacy costs, the total was $89 million, with an average cost per day of $1854.70.

There were 13,225 CINV events treated in the inpatient setting, with an associated total cost of $32 million (average cost per day, $2421.80).

There were 15,306 CINV events treated in the emergency department setting, with an associated total cost of $30 million (average cost per day, $1987.20). There were 19,457 CINV events in the outpatient setting, with an associated total cost of $26 million (average cost per day, $1364.90).

The presence of a CINV event during the index chemotherapy cycle predicted subsequent events.