Personalized Medicine

Axillary Ultrasound versus Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Invasive Breast Cancer

Rosemary Frei, MSc

January 2013, Vol 4, No 1 - Breast Cancer

Vancouver, BC—In the aftermath of the Z0011 study from the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group, oncology centers across the United States are reexamining their approach to axillary management in breast cancer.

The Z0011 researchers determined that axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) is not beneficial in patients with T1 or T2 invasive breast cancer, 1 or 2 positive sentinel nodes, and breast-conserving therapy followed by whole-breast irradiation (Giuliano AE, et al. JAMA. 2011;305:569-575).

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Black Women with Invasive Node-Negative Breast Cancer Less Likely to Get Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy for Axillary Staging, More Likely to Have Lymphedema

Phoebe Starr

January 2013, Vol 4, No 1 - Breast Cancer

San Antonio, TX—Black women with clinically node-negative invasive breast cancer were less likely than white women to undergo sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for axillary staging and also were more likely to develop lymphedema, according to a study presented at the CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

This study adds to the growing body of evidence documenting racial disparities in healthcare access.

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The Missing Perspective in Personalized Cancer Care

Caroline Helwick

November 2012, Vol 3, No 8 - Personalized Medicine

?Vienna, Austria—The identification of genetic mutations and tumor biomarkers to select the right drug for the right patient are not enough to satisfy the need for personalized cancer care, according to Kathy Redmond, MSc, RN, Editor of Cancer World magazine, a publication of the European School of Oncology and former president of the European Oncology Nursing Society, who addressed the topic of personalized medicine at the 2012 European Society for Medical Oncol­ogy Congress.

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A New Personalized Prescription Decision-Making System

Rosemary Frei, MSc

November 2012, Vol 3, No 8 - Personalized Medicine

?Phoenix, AZ—Using the paradigm of individualizing drug therapy based on a patient’s genetics, a group of oncologists and genomic experts have de­signed a genomic prescribing system that they hope will significantly reduce the staggeringly high rate of adverse drug reactions associated with prescription drugs in the United States. Principal investigator Peter H. [ Read More ]

Is Personalized Cancer Care Affordable?

Caroline Helwick

October 2012, Vol 3, No 7 - Personalized Medicine

Vienna, Austria—“Is personalized cancer care affordable?” asked Richard Sullivan, MD, PhD, Director of Kings Health Partners Institute of Cancer Policy and Global Health in the United Kingdom, in an invited presentation at the 2012 European Society for Medical Oncology Congress.

The short answer he gave was “no,” barring seismic shifts not only in the oncology landscape but also in the larger societal picture. He described 3 trends that will be disastrous for controlling the cost of care.

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ESMO Theme: Personalized (“Precision”) Oncology Care Marches Forward

Caroline Helwick

October 2012, Vol 3, No 7 - Personalized Medicine

Vienna, Austria—“One of our themes at the 2012 ESMO Congress is personalized oncology,” European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Presi­dent Martine J. Piccart-Gebhart, MD, PhD, Professor of Oncology at the Université Libre de Bruxelles and Director of the Medicine Department at Jules Bordet Institute, Brussels, Belgium, said at a press briefing at the meeting. She noted that the numerous presentations on targeted therapy and diagnostics at ESMO are evidence that the field is rapidly moving forward.

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Use of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Increasing and Costly in the Management of Head and Neck Cancers, but Value Unknown

September 2012, Vol 3, No 6 - Head and Neck Cancer

Toronto, Canada—The popularity of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer has climbed rapidly in recent years. How­ever, the extra cost associated with this treatment modality may not equate with improved value, according to researchers from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), who presented their analysis at the 2012 International Conference on Head and Neck Cancer.

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