Hematologic Malignancies

CHOP Disappearing as Standard of Care for Indolent NHL

Charles Bankhead

May 2013, Vol 4, No 4 - Hematologic Malignancies

A long-standing treatment standard for indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) has fallen victim to the chopping block, so to speak, at least in Germany.

The use of the cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), doxorubicin (Adriamycin), vincristine (Oncovin), and prednisone (Deltasone; CHOP) regimen with or without rituximab (Rituxan; R-CHOP) has declined rapidly with the emergence of bendamustine (Treanda), which is used either alone or with ri­tuximab.

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No Loss of Efficacy with Anthracycline-Free Induction for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Charles Bankhead

May 2013, Vol 4, No 4 - Hematologic Malignancies

Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) had no drop-off in efficacy with an anthracycline-free regimen that also reduced the long-term risk of cardiotoxicity, reported Andre Baruchel, MD, PhD, Chief of Pediatric Hematology, Robert Debré University Hospital, Paris, France.

Induction therapy without daunorubicin (Cerubidine) led to a 5-year event-free survival (EFS) rate of almost 97%, slightly better than the rate observed in children who received conventional induction that included the anthracycline agent.

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eviti: Decision Support at the Point of Care for Oncologists

Arlene A. Forastiere, MD

May 2012, Vol 3, No 3 - Oncology

An independent health information technology company, eviti, Inc, provides a suite of web-based decision-support services that connects and delivers value to all parties in the care process—patients receive quality care, physicians are assured payment, insurers pay for quality care only, and pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) or specialty pharmacy improve adherence. This decision support platform is a transformative solution that reduces variability in care, improves quality, and enables realignment of provider incentives.

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The Pace of Change in Oncology Management Greater than the Sum of Its Parts

Lee Goldberg

December 2011, Vol 2, No 7 - Oncology

Innovative medications target the molecular structure of cancer cells with increasing precision, resulting in reduced adverse effects. Novel therapies enlist the patients’ own immune systems to defeat cancer. At the same time, as personalized medicine comes of age, improved diagnostic tests match the right patients to these new treatments. The accelerating pace of these developments is improving expectations of patient survivability and the total number of survivors.

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