Economics of Cancer Care

Real-World Treatment Patterns of Axitinib for Advanced Renal-Cell Carcinoma

Laura Morgan

May 2015, Vol 6, No 4 - Economics of Cancer Care

San Diego, CA—Approved in 2012 by the FDA, axitinib (Inlyta) is indicated for the treatment of patients with advanced renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) whose disease had failed 1 previous systemic therapy. The approval of axitinib was based on the safety and efficacy data from clinical trials, which are often limited in their patient population and short-term analysis. [ Read More ]

Medicare’s Sustainable Growth Rate Repeal Met with Relief

Laura Morgan

May 2015, Vol 6, No 4 - Economics of Cancer Care

The April 14, 2015, repeal of the sustainable growth rate (SGR) formula for physician payments under Medicare is being welcomed by the healthcare community, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The 392 to 37 vote to pass H.R. 2, called the Medicare Access and Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2015, came just in time to avoid the 21% cut in Medicare fees that would have come into effect after the most recent SGR patch expired on March 31, 2015. [ Read More ]

US Oncologists Favor Establishment of NICE-Like Body to Determine Medicare Cancer Drugs Reimbursement

Rosemary Frei, MSc

May 2015, Vol 6, No 4 - Economics of Cancer Care

According to a recent study, 63.6% of oncologists surveyed favor the establishment of an independent panel of health experts to decide which treatments Medicare will pay for based on a cost-benefit analysis (Gogineni K, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2015;­33:846-853). Less than 50% of patients and members of the general public think this is a good idea. The United Kingdom’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is one model for such a panel. [ Read More ]

Value of Cancer Care for Most Tumors Lower in United States than in Western Europe

Rosemary Frei, MSc

May 2015, Vol 6, No 4 - Economics of Cancer Care

A reevaluation of the value of cancer care between 1982 and 2010 in the United States versus Western Europe (Soneji S, Yang JW. Health Aff [Millwood]. 2015;34:390-397) paints an entirely different picture from a similar analysis published in 2012 (Philipson T, et­ al. Health Aff [Millwood]. 2012;­­31:667-675). The earlier study found significant improvements in breast and prostate cancer survival in the United States relative to Western Europe, concluding that the high costs in the United States were worth it. [ Read More ]

Millions in Savings by Using Prolaris Test in All Men with Localized Prostate Cancer

Alice Goodman

April 2015, Vol 6, No 3 - Economics of Cancer Care

Orlando, FL—Significant cost-savings in treating patients with prostate cancer could be achieved in the US healthcare system with the use of the cell-cycle progression (CCP) gene-expression assay called Prolaris (from Myriad Genetics Laboratories), according to a poster from E. David Crawford, MD, Professor of Surgery and Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, and colleagues, presented at the 2015 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium. [ Read More ]

Sunitinib Associated with Higher Costs Compared with Pazopanib in Patients with Renal-Cell Carcinoma

Chase Doyle

April 2015, Vol 6, No 3 - Economics of Cancer Care

Hollywood, FL—Sunitinib and pazopanib have long battled for supremacy in treating advanced renal-cell carcinoma (RCC). According to findings presented at the 2015 National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) conference, the newer drug, pazopanib, may have some advantage in terms of total cost of care, but survival outcomes were exactly the same. [ Read More ]