Drug Updates

Imbruvica (Ibrutinib) the First Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Approved for Treatment of Patients with Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Lisa A. Raedler, PhD, RPh

May 2014, Vol 5, No 4 - Drug Updates

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common type of leukemia in adults, is a cancer of B-cell lymphocytes, which originate in the bone marrow, develop in the lymph nodes, and normally fight infection by producing an immune response. In CLL, excess B-cells accumulate in the bone marrow and blood, where they crowd out healthy blood cells. [ Read More ]

Gazyva for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: First FDA-Approved Breakthrough Therapy in Oncology

Lisa A. Raedler, PhD, RPh

March 2014, Vol 5, No 2 - Drug Updates

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a monoclonal disorder characterized by progressive accumulation and proliferation of functionally incompetent B-cells, is the most frequently diagnosed leukemia in the United States. The American Cancer Society has estimated that 4580 Americans will die from CLL in 2013, which represents approximately 19% of all leukemia deaths. Because it can have an insidious onset, CLL is often discovered incidentally after blood work is conducted for another reason. Between 25% and 50% of patients with CLL are asymptomatic at the time of presentation. [ Read More ]

Abraxane Receives a New Indication for the Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

Lisa A. Raedler, PhD, RPh

February 2014, Vol 5, No 1 - Drug Updates

The American Cancer Society has estimated that approximately 45,220 new cases of pancreatic cancer would be diagnosed in the United States in 2013 and approximately 38,460 patients would die of pancreatic cancer in 2013.1 Despite being the tenth most common cancer, pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer deaths, in part because a large majority of patients present with nonresectable advanced disease.2,3

[ Read More ]

Gilotrif: Second-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Indicated for the First-Line Treatment of Patients with Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer and EGFR Mutation

Lisa A. Raedler, PhD, RPh

November 2013, Vol 4, No 9 - Drug Updates

Lung cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers, as well as the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States.1 The American Cancer Society has estimated that more than 159,000 Americans will die from lung cancer in 2013, representing approximately 27% of all cancer deaths.1 Non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common form of the disease, accounts for 85% to 90% of all cases of lung cancer.2

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Revlimid Receives a New Indication for the Treatment of Patients with Relapsed or Progressing Mantle-Cell Lymphoma

Lisa A. Raedler, PhD, RPh

October 2013, Vol 4, No 8 - Drug Updates

Mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL), which accounts for approximately 6% of new non–Hodgkin lymphoma diagnoses, is a rare and often aggressive cancer.1,2 MCL is most often diagnosed in older white adults (typically patients are in their mid-60s) and is usually in advanced stages.1,2 Splenomegaly and lymph node enlargement are typically present, in addition to bone marrow, liver, and gastrointestinal tract involvement.2

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Tafinlar and Mekinist: Two Oral Targeted Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Melanoma and BRAF Mutations

Lisa A. Raedler, PhD, RPh

September 2013, Vol 4, No 7 - Drug Updates

Cutaneous melanoma, although not the most common skin cancer, is the most deadly.1 Based on data collected between 2003 and 2009, the 5-year survival rate for Americans with metastatic melanoma remains very low—only 16%—for all disease stages and for both sexes.2 The National Cancer Institute has estimated that approximately 1 in 49 people will be diagnosed with melanoma in the United States, and more than 9450 people will die of this disease in 2013.2

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Emerging Therapies and New Approaches in the “Double-Refractory” Setting in Myeloma

Wayne Kuznar

September 2013, Vol 4, No 7 - Drug Updates

Chicago, IL—Advances in the understanding of the biology of multiple myeloma and the identification of new drugs have resulted in improved management of myeloma, including for disease refractory to the recent proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents that have been added to the treatment of patients with myeloma.

New therapeutic strategies are needed in this challenging population, said Robert Z. Orlowski, PhD, MD, Professor, Department of Lymphoma/Myeloma, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, at the 2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting.

[ Read More ]