ASCO Annual Meeting

Off-Label Drug Use, Advanced Technologies Driving Up Medicare Cost of Cancer Care

Neil Canavan

August 2011, Vol 2, No 5 - ASCO Annual Meeting

A series of studies presented at this year’s ASCO annual meeting suggest that the use of unwarranted high-cost imaging procedures, a surge in the use of innovative treatment technologies, and off-label use of supportive cancer agents are helping to escalate Medicare costs, leading researchers to suggest that further regulation may be needed to rein in unnecessary expenses. [ Read More ]

Impressive Results with New Drugs for Advanced Prostate Cancer

Neil Canavan

August 2011, Vol 2, No 5 - ASCO Annual Meeting

Chicago, IL—The potential of 2 novel agents still in clinical trials, and 1 drug that was recently approved, offer new hope to patients with metastatic castrate- resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), a disease with a dire prognosis and few good current treatment options.

First-in-Class R-223

One of the investigational agents, alpharadin (radium-223 chloride [R- 223]), may have just earned a chance for an expedited approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) because of its positive results.

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Emerging Regimen for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Has Survival Benefit, but Is It Cost-Effective?

Neil Canavan

August 2011, Vol 2, No 5 - ASCO Annual Meeting

A cost analysis presented at ASCO 2011 and performed at the University of Toronto, Odette Cancer Center, Ontario, showed that the emerging combination regimen that includes oxaliplatin (Eloxatin), iri - no tecan (Camptosar), fluorouracil (Adrucil) and leucovorin (FOLFIRINOX) is not cost-effective when considered within the framework of a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY). [ Read More ]

Genome-Forward Medicine in Lung Cancer

Caroline Helwick

August 2011, Vol 2, No 5 - ASCO Annual Meeting

Chicago, IL—Whole genome sequencing was the topic of a session at the 2011 ASCO annual meeting in which specialists discussed the implications of “genome-forward medicine” in lung cancer.

This entails “how to get to the nature of tumors and their heterogeneity,” said Elaine Mardis, PhD, Codirector of the Genome Institute at Washington University, St Louis, MO. Next-generation sequencing, she said, will eventually guide treatment decisions.

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